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Richard Romano has been a professional writer since , having concentrated predominantly on various graphic communications technologies such as digital imaging, computer graphics, and media trends. From to , he was a senior analyst for TrendWatch Graphic Arts later The Industry Measure , and from to , he had been a writer and editor for Micro Publishing News as well as its then-sister publication Digital Imaging.

He is the co-author, with Dr. He currently contributes to WhatTheyThink. He also contributes to publications outside the industry, such as the CrossFit Games.

The last edition of INTERPOL World concluded on a high note.

Romano also speaks at various seminars and shows and to assorted printing and vendor groups. That probably sounds unromantic! That, I believe, is the true potential of dating apps. I met my husband because his mother cut out a newspaper clip for him about how I was starting Teach For America.

Love in a romantic way will cease to exist. We will only be willing to communicate with the nearly all-knowing AI that we are connected to—which, in fact, is one with us. However, this AI will be connected to everyone else too, so we will always be interconnected in a sort of hive mind. But as the data collection on each of us becomes more.

Research, Business Intelligence and the Sustainable Growth of the Printing Industry in Nigeria

They want an unbundling. Because the decision-making would require more data than is currently available, UI and UX maestros shall have the time of their lives trying to make all that seamless. I also think some of the consequences of increased virtual engagement will be a lack of intimacy and decrease in. I also think some of the consequences of increased virtual engagement will be a lack of intimacy and decrease in sex. Matching algorithms will of course be vastly more effective due to a plethora of data. They may even know our preferences better than we do. The final frontier, however, will be smell—the ability to analyze pheromones and crack the code of attraction.

There will also be a clearer distinction between. There will also be a clearer distinction between and understanding of who is an attractive one-night proposition versus who might make for a successful long-term partner.

Matchmaking will thrive in After major social networks and dating sites get hacked out of existence, digital methods of meeting new people will become socially taboo. As a result, personal networks and in-person connections will be the preferred way to meet both romantic partners and new friends. Some of the most avid matchmakers will be retired millennials who saw this coming and also want grandchildren.

Also, with terrorism at an all-time low, bomb-sniffing dog breeds will now be trained to sniff out pheromone matches, working at airports and parks to bring together potential matches. While the early internet matchmaking boom was based on crude algorithms that matched people by their race, occupation, or interests, this era of Applied Social Chemistry will build on intersections of biology, psychology, data science, and behavioral economics to bring together new matches based on a more holistic set of characteristics and aspirations.

Architects, urban planners, and designers will round out the creative matchmaking industry. Neighborhoods, transportation, and public spaces will be designed to help people forge real connections. Stores and libraries yes, they will still exist will be designed to increase the likelihood of serendipitous encounters. Instead of finding a match on Tinder, as their grandparents had, people will find love on exit So you can alter the face of your partner to look like anyone—including current celebrities such as Blue Ivy Carter.

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Stories of delight, war, love, survival, and of what used to happen before the internet. Audiovisual content will still be king in many different ways—I think different populations of people are now in a space where they are looking for content that reminds them of themselves, and that will become. Audiovisual content will still be king in many different ways—I think different populations of people are now in a space where they are looking for content that reminds them of themselves, and that will become even more focused and deliberate.

At the same time, there are parts of the world that have not met each other yet, especially in the South. All our diasporas scattered across the world have such stories to tell. That will be an interesting place for content and narratives to explore.

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The stories we share will recall how, as a society, we were able to harness tech to serve the greater good. We will remember, but not miss, a world in which we were uncertain of our cybersecurity and of the veracity of online information. The same 12 stories that humanity has been telling in different forms since the Stone Age, only in another media.


  • Pulling Back The Curtain on Rate Base Inflation.
  • Hot Chocolate: and other stories;
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Stories of love and conflict, joys and sadness, and overcoming obstacles. Those stories have been told for centuries, and I really think they will continue to find a place in the future. We will celebrate superpowers that help people both honor our differences and understand our shared values and fate. And with more diverse protagonists, our stories will bring us closer together, rather than exclude.

We will always be telling stories about relationships, because relationships are the most crucial factor in everything. We will tell the stories that always keep us engaged, which are the great stories of passion, betrayal, war, love, family, and money. What the social media boom has shown us is how much we humans love to dramatize the mundane.


  • About the Author!
  • Phantasiegeschichten (German Edition).
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People want to turn their humdrum lives into their own signature movies well, some people do. But we also want fantasy and rule-warping freedom to escape the boring and the repetitive. Hence, the growing fascination. We want some social conventions to remain to make our status anxiety worthwhile. In a few years, the tools for crowd-narrated stories will be much better. Our most engaged discussions about our cultural lives seem to have diverged from the social and political matters that animate us the most. New technologies will enable us to wield our angst into crowd-spun tales of suburban woes and the perfidies of the political class.

Expect a Kickstarter-type co-creation medium for tubecasting that tilts heavily towards hyperlocal stories of resistance and redemption, told with snazzy effects and with patronage in the millions. We will mark the qualities of that era i. The types of entertainment we enjoy depend first on the available technology and the economic structure of content businesses that produce that entertainment. The invention of film, coupled with cinemas where hundreds of people can gather, enabled the two-hour film format to flourish.

The invention of.

The invention of television, paid for by advertising, allowed for the rise of episodic half- and one-hour TV. Once people were able to record episodes, television became serialized, with story and character arcs able to develop in an almost novelistic way. The future of content will be shaped by the same forces. VR allows for truly immersive experiences and it challenges some of our instincts including that stories need to be told linearly. There has been debate for millennia over how much of our storytelling instincts are ingrained—hardwired biologically or through deep archetypes—and how free we are to reinvent storytelling.

I predict that the novel will continue as it is today—as the preeminent medium for exploring the intimate. At the same time, our urge for spectacle, fuelled by the most advanced technologies of the day, will continue to reinvent itself in One of the challenges we faced was finding character and story arcs that could resonate with Western audiences as well. We will have more stories of loss—the end of species, end of languages, end of the industrial age. But we will also have more stories of invention: life.

But we will also have more stories of invention: life on new planets, ways to finally reuse all the plastic in the ocean. We will continue to use stories to grapple with our wrongs, and hold on to stories we find hopeful.

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The chase against fake news will continue. While the topics may not change drastically, the how and context of stories will be different. Stories will not just be a form of entertainment. Implanting new narratives will be a new non-expensive procedure, wholly personalized. The patient, clinician, and designer specializing in ritual and narrative will together craft the narrative, which will be a powerful antidote for anything that undermines our mental health.

Humans will be the same. Magical thinking will still be everywhere, people will still believe in crystals and haunted houses and ghosts and all that stuff. But I think fundamentally.


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But I think fundamentally the world will become more divided—the rich will keep getting richer and the poor will keep getting poorer. We will be much more risk-aware and how we share our folklore will reflect it. Even on an individual level, people and institutions will be facing the true cost of their risks. Telling stories about how we manage our risks as families and individuals—how we reduce the risks of floods, adapt to storms,. Telling stories about how we manage our risks as families and individuals—how we reduce the risks of floods, adapt to storms, contend with heat—will be as mundane as talking about the weather.

Furthermore, stories of shared experiences related to humanitarian conflicts, natural- and climate-driven disasters will become ubiquitous and no longer the exclusive domain of specific geographies or communities. Stories of suffering, sacrifice, and compassion. People will continue to be fascinated by our shared human experience, and continue to be drawn to tragedy and hope, laughter, and sadness. I think the most important question is who will give us information. That should trouble us more than it does.

Another important development is of illusions and deepfakes—it is possible to generate events that seem to be real life but did not actually happen. This has far-reaching political, economic, and social ramifications. This, together with the possibilities to both block and hijack the internet for entire countries can have serious effects on who gets what news. Depends who we are: the elite will meet face-to-face with specialists, politicians, and decision-makers, but the rest of us will be subject to a barrage of deepfakes, troll farms, and detention if we try to spread alternative narratives.

Just like the present day, our main source of news, media, and information will come from the internet. However, we will no longer worry about the authenticity of our news, and have normalized fact-checking tools that ensure the transparency and truthfulness of the media.